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Bolivia Motorcycle Tours has the best all-around bikes for touring in Bolivia.  ​​In our quest to find the right bike for touring in Bolivia, we chose the Kawasaki KLR650, not because it's the best at any single thing but rather because it's a proven platform that's been the number one choice of adventure motorcycle riders as they've traveled the world for the past 30 years.  Our bikes aren't just any old KLR's, they're low-milage, 1st generation KLR's that have been tactfully modified to meet the demands of both the rider & the terrain that we ride.  Most importantly, our bikes are meticulously maintained, so when we're touring we ride more & wrench less.

power outlets for accessories

​oversized tanks for huge range

power outlets for accessories

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storage space for extra gear

​oversized tanks for huge range

power outlets for accessories

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​oversized tanks for huge range

​oversized tanks for huge range

beefy skid plates & crashbars keep the bikes protected regardless of the terrain

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beefy skid plates & crashbars keep the bikes protected regardless of the terrain

beefy skid plates & crashbars keep the bikes protected regardless of the terrain

beefy skid plates & crashbars keep the bikes protected regardless of the terrain

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accident insurance & technical inspection

beefy skid plates & crashbars keep the bikes protected regardless of the terrain

​thermo-bobs & EM doohickeys keep the bikes running at their peak

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​thermo-bobs & EM doohickeys keep the bikes running at their peak

beefy skid plates & crashbars keep the bikes protected regardless of the terrain

​thermo-bobs & EM doohickeys keep the bikes running at their peak

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You might wonder, "so how do you go about getting so many nice 1st generation KLR's to a place like Bolivia?"  The answer in a nut shell is that it takes a good mix of patience and determination.  All of our bikes come from the Pacific Northwest of the United States.  After clearing customs, the bikes shipped out from Seattle, Washington and sailed south to Panama where they were then transferred to a another ship before hitting the open waters once again.  The bikes arrived to Chile (remember, Bolivia is land-locked) about 22 days after departing from Seattle.   After clearing customs in Chile the bikes were loaded up and shipped overland to La Paz, Bolivia.  Despite the bikes being less than 600 miles from their final destination when they arrived to La Paz, it was there that the adventure really began.  After dealing with Bolivian bureaucracy up close and personal for 2 months (people say that was fast)  the bikes were finally released.  Once on the road and finally heading for home, nothing could stop us, not even a blockade in the highway composed of protesters voicing their displeasure with a policy at the local government level.  In all, from doorstep to doorstep it took over 3 months to get the bikes to their new home and that's without mentioning the process of getting the bikes titled and plated once they arrived.  It was an experience that won't soon be forgotten.